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B&W Victorian Era Portraits Are Brought Back to Life with Vibrant Colors…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Emma Taggart on My Modern Met site:

Graphic artist and history buff Frédéric Duriez digitally colorizes vintage black and white photographs, breathing new life into their subjects. Duriez started colorizing war images three years ago, and today his work ranges from old mug-shots to actors and actresses, and most recently, ghost-like portraits from the Victorian era.

The incredible images depict glum-looking children, extravagantly dressed; a sullen young couple, adorned in frilly clothing; a pair of young women, their hair perfectly pinned back; and earnest men, posing proudly. Duriez explains he chose the images because he “was attracted by the beauty of the clothes and especially the dresses of this period.” He adds, “I was fascinated by these portraits without expression because all the looks are frozen in time.”

From monochrome hues, Duriez uses the open-source software GIMP to transform the portraits, presenting brightly colored clothing, blushed cheeks, and in…

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EDITING 101: 59 – Character Profiles…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Character Profiles

Whether you’re a plotter or a pantser (101:21), I’m almost 100% certain that at some point, you’ll have to keep track of your characters’ details. The plotter/pantser post also covered some practical ways that some authors make sure these details are fresh in their minds—or, at least, quickly available.

However, before you can list these precious tidbits of information, you have to either discover them (if your story leads you) or decide on them (if you lead your story). The obvious information is focused on physical appearance: eye color, hair color, stature, body shape, etc. But sometimes authors neglect to round out their profiles with other information that can play a critical part in your story. I’m talking about…

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EDITING 101: Now covers 50 topics to date…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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FYI – Here’s a list of the first 50 free editing tips my good friend and Professional Book Editor Susan Uttendorfsky, the owner of Adirondack Editing, has presented so far.

Catch up with any articles you may have missed by scrolling through the list below and clicking those that are in Blue, Italic and Underlined.

Those still in black are not yet available, so stay tuned for the weekly updates.

EDITING 101: 01 – Introduction and ‘Redundancies’

EDITING 101: 02 – Description Depression

EDITING 101: 03 – THAT’s the Problem in Revising

EDITING 101: 04 – Character Name Consistency

EDITING 101: 05 – General Plurals

EDITING 101: 06 – He Said / She Said: Dialogue Tags

EDITING 101: 07 – Consecutive Versus Concurrent Action

EDITING 101: 08 – Using Song Lyrics in your Manuscript

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EDITING 101: 51 – Identifying Your Book’s Goal…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Identifying Your Book’s Goal

If you’ve written a book, what was the goal of the book?

If you’re not sure, you’re also not alone. A lot of writers don’t examine their goals in writing at all. They know they want to write, and perhaps they know exactly what they want to write—a memoir, a science-fiction series, a literary novel.

There are two types of goals, as I see it, in writing. One would be termed “writing goals”—setting goals in order to assist you with the actual put-your-butt-in-the-chair-and-write action. That will be the subject of a later article.

Today we’re going to discuss “book goals.” What was the idea or purpose behind writing your book? Marketing yourself or a business? Leaving a…

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Fun English Language Facts That All Writers Should Know

A Writer's Path

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by Laura Peters

As a writer, it’s all too easy to get bogged down with the boring bits of the English language, such as grammar rules and sentence structure. But it’s also important to remember that there is also a fun side to language! If you do your research, you’ll find that there are a lot of fun facts related to English. Here are some to get you started!

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