Are You Moving Forward or Just Looking Forward? #inspiration #MondayBlogs #Monday

POTL: All Things Books, Reading and Publishing

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Are you moving forward or just looking forward?

The future is unknown and yet there are many of us who pine for the future, look forward to the future and generally live in the future. The present doesn’t matter, only the future.

Is that really a way to live?

Listen, when I was younger, I lived in the future. I didn’t give a damn about the past or the present. I was miserable and wanted out of the life I was living. So, I propelled myself to the future with thoughts like these:

When I get older, I’ll be successful and show those bullies I’m somebody.

When I get older, I’ll show all those guys what a mistake they made dumping me.

When I become a successful author, I’ll show those agents what a mistake they made not choosing me as a client.

On and on these thoughts went and…

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Tips for a Successful Book Signing

Story Empire

Hey, SEers! Mae here today. Got your pen handy? It’s time to sign some books!  🙂

When it comes to book signings, whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned pro, it never hurts to reevaluate your strategy. I realize not everyone has print copies of their books, but that day might linger just around the corner. Then or now, I hope you find these tips helpful.

Let me start by saying I’m far from an expert. I only have two signings under my belt, with a few on the horizon. That said, I’ve learned from the meager few I’ve done. How, you ask?

Know your venue
If you’re going somewhere you’ve never been before, scope it out beforehand so you know the layout. At the very least, research it online and Google Earth the location. If I’m going somewhere new, I always do a practice run first so I know exactly…

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EDITING 101: 32 – Sentence Length…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Sentence Length

There is no standard sentence length, but it’s still an important factor to consider when revising or editing your manuscript. A sentence can be as short as one word: “What?” On the other end, there are whole books written in one sentence only. Apparently, the current verified world record holder for the longest sentence is Jonathan Coe’s The Rotters Club, published in 2001, contains a sentence with 13,955 words.I don’t recommend this.

According to the blog “Readability Monitor”, “  Based on several studies, press associations in the USA have laid down a readability table. Their survey shows readers find sentences of 8 words or less very easy to read; 11 words, easy; 14 words fairly easy…

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EDITING 101: 31 – Referring to Technology in Your Writing…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Referring to Technology in Your Writing

Technology is everywhere in today’s society, so it’s practically impossible to keep out of our writing. If we have cell phones and computers, then it’s likely our characters do, too. How far should you go in talking about technology in your writing, though?

If you’re trying to write a story in a certain era, then technology can be a great way to date your story. A fictional piece written in the 1970s wouldn’t be complete without talking about eight track players and HiFi stereo systems complete with record albums, turntables, and 45s. A car radio would have push buttons to set the stations and nobody had a mobile or cell phone. A phone was a…

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EDITING 101: 30 – Ellipses…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Ellipses

Ahh, another point of grammar that’s frequently either overused or incorrectly used. And, in this case, it’s understandable! There are so many different ways to use ellipses.

First, we’ll start with the punctuation mark itself. Some authors use three dots in a row…which Microsoft Word will typically convert into an ellipsis character. An ellipsis character only takes up one character space, and can be deleted by backspacing one time. This ellipsis is scrunched together more than if there were simply three period/full stop marks.

Other authors like to use a space in between . . . like this. It’s spread out more and I think it looks nicer. The problem is when it comes at the end of a sentence…

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