Interview with The Talented Ionia Martin

Fiction Favorites

Ionia Martina books-31

John:  Before we start and before Ionia gets here, I have to tell you I am as nervous as a cat in a room full of rocking chairs. I have the opportunity to ask Ionia Martin a series of questions which have been designed to gain additional knowledge about this talented and beautiful person’s decision to become a reviewer. So why be nervous you ask? Why not be nervous? Can you imagine having the opportunity to ask really good questions of an icon and then come up short? . . . Er . . . let me rephrase that. Can you imagine having the opportunity of asking really good questions and then falling flat on your ass because the questions are too mundane or have been asked one hundred times before? To prevent this catastrophic situation I did extensive research and memorized every single interview Ionia has done over…

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Book review challenge series – Ionia Martin

Rosie Amber

Day 5

Today our guest is book reviewer extraordinaire Ionia Martin. Please join me in welcoming her to the blog. Plus we have author Adrienne Vaughan’s views on the importance of book reviews, posting a review to Amazon and gearing up to write your own review.

Ionia Martin

1) Where can readers and writers find your blog?
You can find me at http://readfulthingsblog.com

2) Where do you post your book reviews as well as your blog?
It depends on the book, but I usually cross-post to Amazon.com US and UK as well as posting to Facebook, Linked-in, Goodreads and Twitter. If the author has a publisher site I will sometimes post there too.

3) What type of books will you consider for review?
I don’t do sci-fi books. Otherwise, I accept almost anything that doesn’t include graphic material. If a 15 year old couldn’t read it without blushing or getting sick, I…

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Summoned by Anne M. Pillsworth Blog Tour: Tens List + Giveaway!

Rose Shadow Ink

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Summoned
by Anne M. Pillsworth
(Redemption’s Heir #1)

When the Elder Gods extend an invitation, be wary of the strings attached

While browsing in a rare book store in Arkham, Sean finds an occult book with an ad seeking an apprentice sorcerer, from a newspaper dated March 21, 1895. Even more intriguing, the ad specifically requests applicants reply by email. Sean’s always been interested in magic, particularly the Lovecraftian dark mythology. Against his best friend Edna’s (“call-me-Eddy-or-else”) advice, he decides to answer the ad, figuring it’s a clever hoax, but hoping that it won’t be. The advertiser, Reverend Redemption Orne, claims to be a master of the occult born more than 300 years ago. To prove his legitimacy, Orne gives Sean instructions to summon a harmless but useful familiar—but Sean’s ceremony takes a dark turn, and he instead accidentally beckons a bloodthirsty servant to the Cthulhu Mythos god Nyarlathotep. The…

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Just write!

Cristian Mihai


Odds are that one day you’ll start working on a story for longer than usual. Odds are that you’ll try to make it perfect, even when it’s clear that you’re just afraid to let it go. You’ll fear rejection and bad reviews. You’ll think you’re not good enough to write the story the way it deserves to be written. You haven’t lived long enough and stuff like that.

Maybe you do so because you feel this story’s the “one.” This is the story where you actually say something no one else can, where you leave behind more of you than you’ve done before. It’s the story that defines who you are more than anything else ever written.

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Viewing Creative Writing Choices as a Spectrum, Rather Than “Either-Or”

Creative Writing with the Crimson League

1285311_direction_signsWhen we talk about writing, there is so much discussion about “This” versus “That.” Today I wanted to get a discussion started about how faulty and how limiting that kind of thought is.

Art is self-expression. Writing is art. And while any kind of art will have natural boundaries and limits built in by its very nature, it’s not always healthy to impose unnecessary boundaries.

There are so many things we talk about as cases of “either-or,” when really, what exists is a spectrum between two things, a spectrum that blends and combines elements of opposing styles to varying degrees as the story, author, and scene dictate.

Think about:

Philosophical fiction versus “Action” fiction

I wrote about this yesterday, in a post that discusses how we approach these two varieties of fiction differently, both as readers and writers.

The thing is, fiction is rarely ever purely philosophical or purely about…

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