You need to double your Amazon security

Jean's Writing

You heard right.

Time to double security and protect your books on Amazon. 

Now, not only do I need to work on this year’s taxes, but looks as if I may need to work on my Amazon account.

What the hell? Hackers are now invading Amazon? You’ve got to be kidding me.

I feel as if I’m playing Wack-a-Mole trying to avoid hackers and stupid people. This is getting ridiculous. I change my passwords from time to time, but now I’ve got to do more to keep these crooked jerks out.

Thanks to Janice Hardy over at Fiction University for the warning.

Here’s what I learned today about Amazon Security…

  • Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) accounts are linked to my regular Amazon account.
  • Hackers attempt to break into customer Amazon accounts every single day.
  • If a Hacker gains access to my Amazon account they have access to my KDP.
  • A Hacker will…

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10 Tips for Finding Memorable Character Names for your Fiction…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Anne R. Allen

“Agnes Gooch,” “Mr. McCawber,” “Albus Dumbledore”: memorable names of memorable characters.

How can writers come up with character names that readers will never forget?

In his painfully funny 2006 book, Famous Writing School, a Novel, Stephen Carter’s writing teacher-protagonist advises his students to seek character names in the obituaries. But although Carter’s bumbling protagonist offers mostly dubious advice, that tip is a keeper.

Obits are full of great names. I keep a list of odd names in a little notebook. I haven’t yet written about Normal Peasley or Lamia Trowbridge, but they’re ready when I need them.

Another great name source is spam. If I happen to catch a good name before I hit “empty spam,” I write it in the notebook.  I  can always perk up a story by subjecting my heroine to a blind date with Zoticus Weatherwax or Hassan Snively.

My name notebook is…

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How to transform your writing into beautiful magic

Jean's Writing

I’m not talking about witches and warlocks. Nor, voodoo, potions, or card tricks.

Photo curtsey of IMBD

I’m talking about rhythm that unlocks magic in a story. 

Makes you want to dance.

Every story has a rhythm. A story can stop and stutter like a car running out of gas. Or purr along like a smooth luxury car, as the rider enjoys the view.  Or take your breath away thrilling you with the speed and power of a race car.

Which type of rhythm describes your story?

How a story flows, transforming words into poetry. Lyrical writing produces a rich, layered, evocative, and beautiful story. Rhythm creates and connects emotion to your reader.

WAIT. Don’t stop reading. NOT talking poetry or song lyrics. I’m talking musical storytelling.

About writing a story that moves the reader on a deep, emotional level. Words with musical magic. To write a story that takes my breath away with…

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100 General Creative Writing Prompts (Fiction Ideas Vol. 1) FREE 20th to 23rd January…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Hello, Chris.

I have just published the first in a series of 10 nonfiction booklets.

It will be FREE Wednesday, Jan. 20 to Saturday, Jan. 23, then the regular price will be $0.99 USD.

Thank you very much for the opportunity.

Kate M. Colby

Kate100 General Creative Writing Prompts (Fiction Ideas Vol. 1)

Genre: Nonfiction (subject: creative writing/creativity)


Are you struggling with writer’s block? This booklet contains 100 writing prompts to help you take back control of your creativity. 

Do you feel that novel burning inside you but have trouble brainstorming story ideas? 

Are you an established fiction author looking for a fresh new idea? 

If you’re ready to stop staring at the blank page and start writing NOW, 100 General Creative Writing Prompts is the booklet for you. There’s no fluff and no wasted words – just 100 fiction prompts to get you back to what you do best: writing. 

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EDITING 101: 48 – Using Quotes in Your Book and Research Tips – Part 1…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Using Quotes in Your Book and Research Tips (Part 1)

As often as I run into authors wanting to use song lyrics in their novels, I also run into authors wanting to use quotes in their non-fiction books. (If you missed the post about using song lyrics in your manuscript, you can find it HERE 101:08) It seems that many authors like the way somebody else said something previously and don’t think they can say it any better.

Well, I don’t know about that. But I do know that you cannot simply take someone else’s words—no matter how wonderfully written—and plop them into your for-sale book. That’s plagiarism. And, you cannot simply use a significant amount of material from a book and say where you got it from (aka “citing the reference”) if the material is not in the public domain*. That’s making money…

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How Your Story Opening Foreshadows (Intentionally or Not) What’s to Come…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Peter Selgin  on Jane Friedman site:

Today’s post is by regular contributor Peter Selgin, the award-winning author of Your First Page. He offers first-page critiques to show just how much useful critical commentary and helpful feedback can be extracted from a single page—the first page—of a work-in-progress. Learn more about getting a first-page critique.

First Page

September 1942

I crawled forward from the cargo hold after the plane stopped throwing us around. I made sure to find handholds at each point in case the plane jolted again. Only when I reached the cockpit did I pull myself upright, grabbing the door frame for support.

Lieutenant Robert Jones, our pilot, smiled when he saw my reflection. “Glad you came up, Lieutenant Bowman. Sit there.” He motioned to make sure I heard him over the grating noise. The engine must have swallowed a huge amount…

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What is the image you want to project?

Jean's Writing

Are you being true to your persona?

Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition:

“the personality that a person (such as an actor or politician) projects in public:  image”

In other words your image. Your image as an author.

Learning how to share on social media can help us improve as writers and bloggers. And possibly sell more books. Now, who doesn’t want that?

Donna Galanti wrote an article that talks about how a writer can present a consistent image to readers on social media, and she really got me to thinking about mine.

I’m not sure I’ve hit the mark with my author persona, yet. But I’ll keep trying.

Donna suggests the image doesn’t need to be genre-based unless that is all you want people to know about yourself.

So how can what can we do to help readers know what to expect?

  • Define and keep up a message that is constant and…

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